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Insect Pest Management on Turfgrass

Granulate cutworm larvae.
Turfgrass is grown in many environments and for different uses, including home lawns, parks, athletic fields, cemeteries, golf courses, sod farms, pastures, and right-of-ways. The intensity of turfgrass insect management largely depends on the turf species, variety, and its intended use. This eighteen-page fact sheet describes how to manage a variety of insect pests including armyworms, bermudagrass mite, cutworms, fire ants, ground pearls, hunting billbug, mole crickets, scales/mealybugs, southern chinch bug, twolined spittlebugs, tropical sod webworm, and white grubs. Written by Eileen A. Buss and Adam G. Dale, and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig001

Management of Cucurbit Downy Mildew in Florida

Figure 2. Early symptoms on squash characterized by chlorotic angular lesions?circled in red. Credits: M. Paret
Cucurbit downy mildew is a major disase that affects over 40 species of cucurbits, like watermelon, muskmelon, cucumber, squash, and pumpkin. The classic sign of the disease is the presence of dark sporangia, a structure that holds developing spores, on the underside of infected leaves. As the disease progresses, it may lead to large necrotic areas that cause defoliation and a reduction of yield and marketable fruit. This nine-page fact sheet describes the symptoms and signs, epidemiology and disease cycle, host range and pathotypes, and the ways to manage cucurbit downy mildew. Written by Mason J. Newark, Mathews L. Paret, Nicholas S. Dufault, Pamela D. Roberts, Shouan Zhang, Gary E. Vallad, Josh Freeman, and Gene McAvoy, and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp325

How the General Public and Local Officials Prefer to Learn about Agricultural Water Use in Florida

Sprinklers watering athletic fields. UF/IFAS Phto by Tyler Jones.
Water is a precious resource that is invaluable to the state of Florida. The amount of water being used daily in the state is estimated at 14.3 million gallons. Part of a series dedicated to describing the preferred ways of learning about agricultural water use in Florida, this study can be used to assist Extension educators and the agricultural industry at large in the development of strategies meant to inform people about the realities of water use. This three-page fact sheet helps Extension educators understand preferred learning mediums so they can provide useful information about agricultural water use. Written by Courtney T. Owens, Alexa J. Lamm, and Ricky W. Telg and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc247

Landscape Integrated Pest Management

Figure 3. Tussock moth caterpillar feeding on an oak leaf. Fras droppings are shown beneath the caterpillar, indicating the type of pest. Credits: A.G. Dale

Every landscape manager has a pest management toolbox, which contains tools that represent different management strategies. People can be quick to use pesticides, but an integrated approach using multiple tools can be much safer, have longer lasting beneficial effects, and in some cases cut costs. This 5-page fact sheet will help Extension agents and specialists, lawn and landscape managers, Florida Master Gardeners, and homeowners develop long-term sustainable pest management programs using an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) framework. Written by Adam G. Dale and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in109

How to Chemigate Salinity-Stressed Plants with Hydrogen Peroxide to Increase Survival and Growth Rates

Figure 3. Oxygen fertilization saved bald cypress plants flooded by 8 PPT sodium chloride for four days. Left plant: no oxygen fertilization, no salinity, growing well; middle plant: no oxygen fertilization, 8 PPT salinity stressed, died; right plant: oxygen fertilization, 8 PPT salinity stressed, growing well.

Man-made activities can induce climate change and global sea-level rise, posing threats to the survival and growth of coastal vegetation in Florida. This three-page fact sheet explains how to ensure plant survival and facilitate the growth of coastal vegetation threatened by sea-level rise and the resulting oxygen deficiencies and saline stresses. Written by Guodong Liu, Yuncong Li, Kimberly Moore, Kim Gabel, Lei Wu, and Rafael Muñoz-Carpena, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1280

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: 'Atlantic'

Figure 1. Typical tuber set and internal flesh color of Atlantic. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli

This article introduces the potato variety, ‘Atlantic’, which was tested in trials at the University of Florida.’Atlantic’ is a white-skinned, chipping potato commonly cultivated in Florida and resealed as a white mutant of the USDA breeding program. This three-page fact sheet provides the general characteristics, season length and growth information, fertilization and planting instructions, as well as disease information for the potato variety, ‘Atlantic’. Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1278

Consumers' Response to "Neonic-Free" and Other Insect Pollinator Promotions on Ornamental Plants

bee pollinating citrus flower

Pollinator insects are essential to world food crop production, the economy, and the environment. Neonicotinoid (neonic) insecticides are facing intense backlash from environmental groups because the systemic protection they provide throughout the plant, including the pollen and nectar, may be injuring pollinator insects and causing their population decline. But many nursery and greenhouse growers use neonic-based pesticide control measures because they are effective, inexpensive, and cause less environmental damage than other insecticides. The increased publicity may influence consumer demand and preferences but very few studies have investigated consumer responses to neonic-free labels, and evidence suggests that many consumers have little knowledge or awareness of the issue. This 3-page fact sheet describes the results of a the study investigating how consumers’ awareness of neonic insecticides influenced their preferences and purchasing behavior for plants and exploring the marketing potential of using alternate pollinator promotions (besides neonic-free) in garden center retail outlets. Written by Hayk Khachatryan and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe991

Consumer Perceptions of Lawn Fertilizer Brands

L. Trenholm

Widespread urbanization in the United States has increased the number of lawns. A healthy lawn provides many benefits, including urban heat dissipation, water quality protection, erosion control, carbon sequestration, community safety, aesthetics, and property value growth. Many homeowners maintain their healthy lawns by applying fertilizers throughout the growing season, but excess fertilizer runoff and leaching have received much attention recently because of waterway pollution and algae blooms, leading many states to place restrictions on what chemicals can be used in lawn fertilizers.

Consumers’ increased environmental awareness creates a niche opportunity for the fertilizer industry to promote environmentally friendly lawn fertilizers, but in order to effectively exploit it, industry stakeholders must understand consumer purchasing behavior before expending labor, time, and money creating products for sale. The following 3-page report written by Hayk Khachatryan, Alicia Rihn, and Michael Dukes and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department covers research methodology and the existing brand awareness and selection of consumers in the lawn fertilizer industry. It also discusses homeowners’ preferences for certain fertilizer attributes. Consumer awareness, selection, and attribute preferences indicate existing behavior, and understanding existing behavior assists in the development of effective marketing programs, promotional strategies, and policies.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe990

Spotted Wing Drosophila in Florida Berry Culture

Male adult spotted wing drosophila
Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is an invasive pest that was introduced into Florida in 2009. Spotted wing drosophila survives well under Florida’s climatic conditions. In 2014, losses to berry crops in Florida were estimated at $35 million. Losses are due to maggot-infested fruit, which is unacceptable for the fresh berry market, and puncture holes in the fruit made by egg-laying females. The holes lead to secondary infection by fungal and bacterial pathogens. This 4-page fact sheet written by Lindsy E. Iglesias, James F. Price, Craig R. Roubos, Justin M. Renkema, and Oscar E. Liburd and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology describes the flies and some strategies to identify them and manage them in berry operations.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in839

Leafy Greens in Hydroponics and Protected Culture for Florida

Figure 2. Market display of ?Bright Lights? chard. Credits: Natalie Parkell
Leafy greens are some of the top “powerhouse” fruits and vegetables. They are also becoming increasingly more popular for consumers. This seven-page fact sheet is designed to aid Florida hydroponic and/or other protected culture growers who are seeking appropriate cultivars of the leafy greens group. The article covers spinach, Swiss chard, kale, collard greens, mustard greens, and Asian greens. Written by Natalie B. Parkell, Robert C. Hochmuth, and Wanda L. Laughlin and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1279

Pest Strips: You Have to Read the Fine Print

Figure 1. Typical pest strip sold at retail outlets. Credits: UF/IFAS Pesticide Information Office.
Pest strips are commonly sold at many retail outlets and are available to anyone for purchase. They are constructed of resin plastic with an insecticide that is gradually control-released over time as a vapor. This two-page fact sheets gives important tips on how to use pest strips correctly without creating a hazard.Written by Fred Fishel and published by the Agronomy Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi262

My Pine Is Under Attack: What Should I Do? A Primarily Insect-Based Decision-Support Guide for Pine Death Management

loblolly
This guide is intended to help tree owners and Extension personnel in Florida and the adjacent southeastern region make decisions about backyard pine trees that display signs of attack by wood borers. The three-page pictorial guide written by Jiri Hulcr and published by the School of Forest Resources and Conservation will help determine whether beetles have attacked a pine tree, how far along the attack has progressed, and what to do about it. There are many sources of pine stress other than insects, so for complete advice, please contact your county Extension agent or post your question at the Tree Health Diagnostics Forum at the University of Florida website: http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/treehealth.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr399

Common Pines of Florida

loblollyPine trees are highly important to Florida’s ecosystems and economy. There are seven species of native pines, and each grows best in a particular environment. People have found varied uses for each species as well. Several species are of commercial value and are cultivated and managed to provide useful products such as paper, industrial chemicals, and lumber. Some species are also managed to enhance wildlife habitat and to provide attractive landscapes. Of course, many pines grow naturally. Like any natural resource, pines may provide more benefits if they are managed wisely. This 11-page fact sheet written by Niels Proctor and Martha Monroe and published by the School of Forest Resources and Conservation gives an overview of the features and identification of the major pines found in Florida.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr003

Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming #5: Using Critical Thinking Styles to Enhance Team Work

colorful people around a table
The final part of the Integrating Critical Thinking in Extension Programming series, this article continues the discussion of how to take into account critical thinking methods and styles when developing Extension programs. Well-formed working groups allow members to work successfully solve problems as a group. This three-page fact sheet explains the importance of critical thinking styles when it comes to team work. Written by Alexa J. Lamm and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc210

Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming #4: Measuring Critical Thinking Styles Using the UFCTI

Some home occupants are more bothered by their utility bill than others.
The fourth installment in the Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming series, this article explains the University of Florida Critical Thinking Inventory (UFCTI), a method of determining a person’s critical thinking style. This three-page fact sheet describes the history and development of the UFCTI, how to interpret the results, and how to use the test to enhance Extension programs. Written by Alexa J. Lamm and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc209

Hydrilla: Florida's Worst Submersed Weed

Hydrilla in a lake
Hydrilla, which was originally introduced to the state as an aquarium plant, was intentionally planted in canals by aquarium plant dealers in the 1950s and quickly escaped cultivation. In addition to being one of the world’s worst aquatic weeds, the species is Florida’s most intensively managed submersed plant. Hydrilla is a federally listed noxious weed and a prohibited aquatic plant in Florida, making cultivation, sale, and possession of the species illegal. This 7-page fact sheet discusses the classification, characteristics, habitat, and management of hydrilla. Written by Lyn A. Gettys and Stephen F. Enloe, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag404

Cost of Production for Processed Oranges in Central Florida (Ridge), 2014/15

oranges on the tree with orchard in background
UF/IFAS researchers collected data from five growers to estimate the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in central Florida during 2014/15. The cost estimates in this 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department do not represent any individual operation. Instead, their purpose is to serve as a benchmark for the Florida citrus industry. Typical users of these estimates include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe985

Cost of Production for Fresh Grapefruit in East Florida (Indian River), 2014/15

Orange grove.
This 4-page article written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department presents the cost of production per acre for growing fresh grapefruit in the Indian River region during 2014/15, based on a survey of growers conducted at the Indian River Citrus League production committee meeting in March 2015. The cost estimates do not represent any individual operation; rather, their purpose is to serve as a benchmark for the industry. Typical users of these estimates include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FE984

Choosing a Licensed Wood-Destroying Organism (WDO) Inspector

Eastern subterranean termite
A wood-destroying organism inspection is a visual inspection performed by a licensed pest control inspector trained to identify evidence of termites, powderpost beetles, and other organisms that chew on wood and cause damage to property. Home buyers and sellers, real estate professionals, and lending institutions order these inspections before real estate transactions. This 4-page fact sheet written by Faith M. Oi, Paul Mitola, Kathleen Ruppert, Michael Page, and Mark Ruff and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department explains how to select an inspector who is licensed and certified so that you can be confident in the inspection.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN629

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: ?Marcy?

Figure 1. Typical tuber and internal flesh color of Marcy potato variety. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli
This article introduces the potato variety, ‘Marcy’, which was developed at the University of Florida. ‘Marcy’ is a white-flesh and white-skinned fresh-market potato variety that has demonstrated high yield and good tuber characteristics. This three-page fact sheet provides the general characteristics, season length and growth information, fertilization and planting instructions, as well as disease information for the potato variety, ‘Marcy’.
Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1277


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