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Goat Parasite Control: General Guidelines

Figure 1. Use mucous membrane colors as an indication of anemia.  Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitism is the leading cause of death and decreased production in goats. At least 48% of farms in the southeast have parasites that are resistant to all classes of dewormers. While there is no one-size-fits-all recommendation for parasite control, the information in this fact sheet is provided for on-farm use. Contact your veterinarian for specific recommendations. Information was provided by Dr. Sarah Reuss of the UF Large Animal Medicine Service. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Sarah Reuss, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an294

Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Figure 1. The western honey bee, Apis mellifera, collecting nectar from a flower.Protecting honey bees and other pollinators from pesticide impacts is important to the sustainability of agriculture. Consequently, pesticide applicators must determine if there is a clear hazard to managed or wild populations of bees. Potential exposure of bees to pesticides can vary greatly depending on the type of pesticide, formulation, application method, label restrictions, and other factors. The goal in using a pesticide is to achieve maximum benefit (success) with minimum negative impact, and these factors should always be considered in pesticide selection. This publication is written (1) to help assure the sustainability of both bees and agriculture by informing beekeepers, pesticide users, and the general public about the often complex relationship between pollinators (specifically bees) and pesticides, (2) to offer guidance for improved communication between beekeepers and pesticide users, (3) to offer pollinator risk-reducing strategies for growers and other applicators when using pesticides, and (4) to provide clarity in laws, labeling, and associated definitions. This 14-page fact sheet was written by J. D. Ellis, J. Klopchin, E. Buss, F. M. Fishel, W. H. Kern, C. Mannion, E. McAvoy, L. S. Osborne, M. Rogers, M. Sanford, H. Smith, P. Stansly, L. Stelinski, and S. Webb, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1027

Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) for Citrus Trees

Figure 1.  Iron deficiency symptomsSince mineral nutrition is a major factor in maximizing yield of high-quality fruit, understanding the functions of mineral elements, diagnosing nutrient deficiencies, and providing needed fertilizers are essential. This publication describes and discusses iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) deficiencies, functions, and recommended practices to alleviate nutritional problems. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Mongi Zekri and Tom Obreza, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss617

Manganese (Mn) and Zinc (Zn) for Citrus Trees

Figure 1.  Manganese deficiency symptomsSince mineral nutrition is a major factor in maximizing yield of high-quality fruit, understanding the functions of mineral elements, diagnosing nutrient deficiencies, and providing needed fertilizers are essential. This publication describes and discusses manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies, functions, and recommended practices to alleviate nutritional problems. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Mongi Zekri and Tom Obreza , and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss616

Como hacer una trampa interceptora de chinches de cama de articulos comunes del hogar.

Figure 10. Interceptor trap placed under the leg of a piece of furniture.Las chinches de cama se han convertido en un problema de plagas cada vez más común en los Estados Unidos. Se han encontrado en muchos lugares diferentes en donde vive la gente, desde escuelas y restaurantes a consultorios médicos y salas de cine, pero las peores infestaciones son por lo general en lugares donde vive la gente, descansan y duermen como en casas, pisos, apartamentos, hoteles y refugios para desamparados. Las chinches de cama son más comunes en lugares como alrededor de piezas de mobiliario en donde la gente se sienta o acuesta- camas, sillas y sofás. Para descubrir si las chiches están presentes en una habitación o un mueble, el dispositivo llamado trampa interceptora de chinches puede ser útil. Las trampas interceptoras atrapan y recogen las chinches de cama cuando tratan de viajar entre sus huéspedes humanos y sus escondites. Las trampas interceptoras de chinches de cama son fácilmente hechas de artículos del hogar y recipientes de plástico desechables. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Benjamin A. Hottel, Rebecca W. Baldwin, Roberto M. Pereira, and Philip G. Koehler, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1026

Black Medic Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1.  Black medic Black medic (Medicago lupulina) is a dark green annual with spreading, prostrate growth. Leaves are alternate with three leaflets on square stems. Leaflets are obovate to elliptic, toothed near the tip, and have a small spur on the tip. Bright yellow flowers are produced in tight, compressed clusters at leaf axils. Reproduction occurs via seed in tightly coiled black seed pods. This 2-page fact sheet was written by Barry J. Brecke, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and Darcy E. P. Telenko, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep494

Sedge Biology and Management in Turf

Figure 1. Purple nutsedge Members of the sedge family have leaves that are composed of a blade, sheath, and ligule. The leaf sheath is closed and the ligule is often absent, and when present is tiny. Stem structure is often triangular.This 3-page fact sheet was written by D. E. P. Telenko, Ramon Leon, J. Bryan Unruh, and B. J. Brecke, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep492

Effect of Fertilizer Phosphorus Rate of Tomato and Green Bean Yield and Growth in High pH Sandy Soils of South Florida

tomato harvestThis 4-page fact sheet addresses the effect of phosphorus rate on tomato and green bean yield and growth in high pH soils and discusses their relationship to both nutrition and fertilizer management. Written by Kelly T. Morgan and Kamal Mahmoud, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss611

How to Calculate a Partial Nitrogen Mass Budget for Potato

Figure 1.  Center pivot irrigated potato in Florida.This 6-page fact sheet provides information on the importance of nitrogen budgets for potato cultivation and discusses the steps in preparing the budget. It allows growers to understand the inputs, cycling, and exports of nutrients within and away from the farm, develop a nutrient budget, and analyze best management practices (BMPs) for their farm. The results will be increased N fertilizer use efficiency, increased environmental protection, and reduced economic losses associated with potato cultivation. This document will also aid county agents, environmental management advisors, and government agency staff members who help farmers improve and implement nutrient BMPs to protect water quality. Written by Rishi Prasad and George Hochmuth, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss614

Effect of Reduced Soil pH with Sulfur on Available Soil Phosphorus in High pH Sandy Soils of South Florida

bean pickerThis 3-page fact sheet addresses the effect of moderating soil pH by using sulfur amendments in high pH soils and discusses their relationship to both nutrition and fertilizer management. Written by Kelly T. Morgan and Kamal Mahmoud, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, December 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss612

Intestinal and Tracheal Parasites of Poultry

backyard flockA parasite is defined as an animal or plant that derives sustenance and/or protection by living in or on another animal or plant called the host. Intestinal and tracheal parasites of poultry are commonly referred to as ?worms,? although this term is technically not correct. These parasites can cause chickens in a flock to appear unthrifty, which often leads to secondary complications. In some cases, the parasites can cause mortality in the flock. Frequent inspection of the flock for signs of illness is the best management tool for identifying when these parasites are a problem. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Gary D. Butcher and Michael A. Davis, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, April 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa078

Preparacion de alimentos en pure

Figure 1. High-protein puréed breakfastUn alimento en puré es un alimento que ha sido licuado, mesclado o procesado hasta crear una textura uniforme y suave. Los ejemplos de alimentos con una consistencia en puré incluyen la salsa de manzana, relleno de tarta de calabaza y humus. Los alimentos en puré pueden ser necesarios para personas con problemas al tragar y/o masticar. Para aquellos que requieren una dieta basada de purés, es muy importante proveer una variedad de alimentos. Casi todas las comidas se pueden preparar como puré. Sin embargo, algunas comidas pueden ser más aceptadas que otras. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Wendy J. Dahl y Jamila R. Lepore, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs246

Alimentos en pure: Los pures altos en proteina

Figure 1. High-protein puréed breakfastLa proteína es un nutriente esencial que nuestro cuerpo necesita para funcionar correctamente y de manera eficiente. Cada célula, tejido y órgano del cuerpo necesita una fuente constante de proteínas para mantener una buena salud y un buen funcionamiento. Para que estos procesos metabólicos ocurran, las proteínas se descomponen para que el cuerpo las pueda usar y se reemplazan por los alimentos que comemos. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Jamila R. Lepore y Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs245

Conservation Easements: Options for Preserving Current Land Uses

Figure 1. Scrubjay pond. Credit: Chris Demers, UF/IFAS ExtensionConservation easements are cost-effective means for government agencies or non-government conservation organizations to protect land. Instead of purchasing land outright, these agreements allow organizations to purchase the development rights of a property. This protects the land and saving money. Landowners who choose this option prevent future residential and commercial development of their land, and reduce the amount of inheritance tax liability. Landowners are encouraged to enter such agreements carefully because they require several rights to be conveyed to the easement grantee and the duration of these agreements is typically perpetual. This 5-page fact sheet describes conservation easements, what is involved in establishing one, tax implications, participating government and non-government organizations, and important considerations for landowners. Written by Chris Demers and Douglas R. Carter, and published by the UF Department of School of Forest Resources and Conservation, March 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr149

Valuing the Recreation Uses of Natural Resources: The Travel Cost Method

kayakers on Florida springsMany available statistics provide evidence that outdoor recreation in Florida generates economic value, but these data do not capture the full recreation value of Florida’s natural resources. The Travel Cost Method (TCM) approach may be applied in cost-benefit analysis and in natural resource damage assessments where recreation values are relevant. This 8-page fact sheet summarizes and synthesizes economic texts on TCM and provides an overview of a case study in which the TCM was used to estimate the nature-based recreation use value of the Apalachicola River Region in Florida. Written by Elizabeth F. Pienaar, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw386

Five Steps to Seasonal Savings

Figure 2. Developing a holiday spending plan can make the holidays less stressful for you. When the holiday season is over you may find yourself saying: ?Why did I spend all of that money? Why did I wait until the last minute to shop? I don?t even want to think about how long it will take to pay off the credit cards. I hope I didn?t take too much money out of the ATM. Did I buy my mom the same gift twice? I should have had a plan.? By following a few simple steps, you can end this post-holiday hangover. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Ricki McWilliams, Julie Pigott-Dillard, and Michael Gutter, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, January 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1405

Facts about Flavonoids

red onionFlavonoids are organic compounds that occur naturally in plants. More than five thousand flavonoid compounds exist in nature, but those found in foods fall into six major categories: flavonols, anthocyanidins, isoflavones, flavan-3-ols, flavones, and flavonones. The compounds in these categories are of interest because of their potential health benefits. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Inbar Schapsis and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs244

Facts about Carbohydrate

Figure 1. Nutrition labelCarbohydrate, fat, and protein are the three nutrients that provide energy (calories). However, carbohydrate from starch and sugars is our main and most important source of energy. During digestion, starch is broken down to sugar (glucose). Carbohydrate in the form of glucose provides energy to cells, tissues, and organs to carry out daily activities. Some glucose is stored in the liver and muscle cells for later use when required. Children need carbohydrate for growth, and adults need carbohydrate to maintain their weight. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Nancy J. Gal, Amanda L. Ford, and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs243

Facts about Antioxidants

Plate of vegetables and a blood pressure cuff and monitorOur bodies are made up of cells. Chemical reactions necessary for life are constantly occurring inside our cells, and sometimes they create free radicals — highly reactive molecules that can initiate damaging chain reactions known as oxidative stress.
Antioxidants can inactivate free radicals and protect our cells from oxidative stress and the damage it causes. Antioxidants also can help our immune system defend against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and some cancers. The body produces some of its own antioxidants, but eating a plant-based diet increases the level of antioxidants in our bodies. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Kaitlin G. Clark and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, February 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs242

Cryptobia iubilans in Cichlids

Figure 1. Typical granuloma seen in a wet mount of stomach tissue from an African cichlid with Cryptobia iubilans infection. The section is unstained and is examined with a light microscope (100x) After many years of diagnostics at the University of Florida and at other laboratories around the country, it appears that Cryptobia iubilans is not uncommon among cichlids, and that environmental and other factors determine the extent of disease.This 3-page fact sheet was written by Ruth Francis-Floyd and Roy Yanong, and published by the UF Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm077


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